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The Best Ways to Store Fresh Herbs

Today: A lesson on keeping your fresh herbs fresh.

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There are few things as inspiring as a beautiful bunch of fresh herbs. We love you, salt and pepper, but only fresh herbs have the special power to transform a dish with nothing more than a few small leaves.

It’s fun to buy beautiful bouquets of fresh parsley, sage, and thyme on your Sunday market trip and envision all of the beautiful meals you will make in the coming week. (It’s even better when you can buy them at the farmers market and impulse-buy a cider donut or kettle corn).

But what happens by the time Thursday rolls around, and those perky green herbs have turned wilted and swampy in the fridge, just when you were about to whip up a batch of pesto?

Say goodbye to dull, limp herbs. Here’s how to keep your fresh herbs fresh all week long.

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First, sort your herbs.

Herbs fall into two categories: hard and soft. Soft herbs like basil, parsley, cilantro, and tarragon have soft, tender stems. Hard herbs have woody stems, and include rosemary, oregano, marjoram, and thyme.

Next, store them properly.

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Now that you’ve organised your fresh herbs, store them so they last.

Soft herbs like to be treated as you would a bouquet of flowers. Snip the base of the stems and put them in a glass of fresh water, changing out the water every day or two if it starts to cloud. Basil should be kept at room temperature, but a glass filled with other soft herbs should go in the fridge, loosely covered with a plastic bag.

Store your hard herbs by wrapping them first in a damp paper towel, then loosely in plastic wrap, and keeping them in your crisper. (If you’re going green, a damp kitchen towel and airtight container works perfectly well.)

A final tip: Don’t wash fresh herbs until they are ready to be used; it will add excess moisture and waste time.


Words: Lisa Kolb

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